KEE, Hayden

Assistant Professor

B.A. (Mount Allison University); M.Phil. (K.U. Leuven); Ph.D. (Fordham University)
Rm 430
39437148
hkee@cuhk.edu.hk
https://haydenkee.com/

Brief Biography

Hayden Kee received his B.A. in Philosophy at Mount Allison University (Canada), his M.Phil. in Philosophy at K.U. Leuven (Belgium), and his Ph.D. in Philosophy at Fordham University (USA). Kee joined the Department of Philosophy at the Chinese University in 2021.

Kee’s research focuses on questions of mind, language, and cognitive science, all broadly construed. He is interested in how language and other higher cognitive abilities relate to more basic, embodied abilities and processes, such as emotion, perception, action, and preverbal communication. His approach to these questions is based in the European phenomenological tradition, in particular the work of Husserl, Heidegger, and Merleau-Ponty. He also draws from analytic philosophy; 4E cognitive sciences; and empirical research in psychology, linguistics, and neuroscience. His work increasingly engages the Indian philosophical tradition, especially the yoga school.

Kee has been awarded various research fellowships and grants from the Canadian Research Council, the German Academic Exchange Foundation, and the John Templeton Foundation, among other funding bodies.

Research Interests

  1. Continental Philosophy
  2. Phenomenology
  3. Philosophy of Language
  4. Indian Philosophy

Selected Publications

The publications listed below are available at Kee’s academia.edu page. If you have difficulty accessing any of these publications, contact Kee directly.

 

  1. 2020. “Fashioning the Word-Tool: The Instrumental Character of the Word in Yogic Mantra Meditation and Phenomenology.” Philosophy East and WestAvailable online.
  2. 2020. “The Surplus of Signification: Merleau-Ponty and Enactivism on the Continuity of Life, Mind, and Culture.” Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 28(1): 27-52. Available online.
  3. 2020. “Horizons of the Word: Words and Tools in Perception and Action.” Phenomenology and the Cognitive SciencesAvailable online.
  4. 2019. “Pointing the Way to Social Cognition: A Phenomenological Approach to Embodiment, Imitation, Pointing, and Social Cognition in the First Year.” Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical PsychologyAvailable online.
  5. 2019. “Phenomenological Reduction in Merleau-Ponty’s The Structure of Behavior: An Alternative Approach to the Naturalization of Phenomenology.” European Journal of Philosophy 28(1): 15-32. Available online.  (Named EJP‘s 2019 Prize Essay in Transcendental Philosophy)
  6. 2018. “Sense-Making from the Top Down: Phenomenology and Naturalism in Autopoietic and Radical Enactivism.” SyntheseAvailable online.
  7. 2018. “Phenomenology and Ontology of Expression and Language: Merleau-Ponty on Speaking and Spoken Speech.” Human Studies 41(3): 415-435. Available online.